Bears vs Packers: Week 6 Recap – Bears lose. Again

The Bears took on the Packers on Sunday, and the results were…the same as they usually are

Bears vs Packers
Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Your Chicago Bears (3-3) lose vs the Green Bay Packers (5-1) 24-14. Not much else is new, besides Aaron’s new soundbite. “I own you!” Tough, but fair. Bears were actually within striking distance for the whole game, even having jumped out to an early 7-0 lead, as well as cutting it to 3 points with a long touchdown drive late. Yet, as soon as Rodgers got the ball in his hands in the 4th, you knew what was going to happen. At the same time, we saw a few bright spots. I’ll do my best to play those up.

1st Quarter 

Neutral zone infraction on the first play, and the next was a 16-yard scramble from Rodgers. Nice foreshadowing. Aaron Jones followed it with a nice run, Rodgers had a couple of short passes after that, but the Bears ultimately get some early-down run stops, force the Packers into a 3rd and long, and sack Rodgers to get off of the field. At which point the Bears, somehow, not only establish the run with Khalil Herbert but get a perfect 3/3 passing drive from Justin Fields. Add in a long PI and the Bears punch in a 7-0 early lead with Herbert.

Next drive Bears get a 3 and out after Quinn gets home on 3rd and long. What could possibly go wrong? Good return as Grant got a little banged up, a great run from Herbert, Fields scrambles for a near first when the pocket collapses on 3rd and 5, we pick it up on 4th and short. A few plays later, Green Bay clearly jumps into the neutral zone.

Refs don’t call it, Justin thinks he has a free play (that Allen Robinson seemingly gives up on) and Green Bay gets an interception in the end zone that should have never happened. The refs would never allow that to happen to Rodgers, by the way. The Bears started off getting good pressure on Green Bay’s next drive. So inevitably, the refs miss Rodgers grabbing Mario Edwards Jr.’s face mask and hit Edwards with an unsportsmanlike for reacting to it. Typical. 

2nd Quarter

Packers run a QB sneak on a 4th and 1. Bears run defense responds, and then Davante Adams kills Jaylon Johnson for 29 yards on a slant. Johnson had been shadowing Adams, he was doing well on the outside, but this one came from the slot. Eventually Green Bay scores on a shovel pass to tie the game. Bears go 3 and out, and it feels like Green Bay is figuring it out. They are. Dillon runs for 38 to start the next drive.

Green Bay eventually settles for a field goal after they get called for OPI. Quinn had a big TFL on the drive as the defense fought back after the big lead. Still, Green Bay takes a 10-7 lead. Bears start off well with the run, dodge a bullet on another Fields near pick, have another shot to tie the game but ultimately take a sack on 3rd down, and have to punt instead of getting up a field goal attempt. 

3rd Quarter

Bears start the 3rd with a few runs, but a dropped pass on a screen to Herbert leads to a punt. Green Bay takes over on offense, they go to DA on 1st down, gash the bears with Aaron Jones after that. We get another questionable PI penalty on 3rd and 4, and after a Marcedes Lewis reception and even more Aaron Jones the Pack go up 10.

The ballgame feels done at this point. Bears try to get something going with more Herbert, as well as a nice pass to Mooney, but the drive ultimately stalls. Hicks sacks the Packers on a free run to get off the field the next drive, but seemingly hurt himself on the play. 

4th Quarter

After an 82 yard punt, the Bears take over from their own 20. After 2 solid runs, Fields finds Robinson for a 20-yard strike down the middle of the field on 3rd and short. Could have had the easy first with his legs but you love the confidence. On the next play, he responds with a 21-yard strike to Cole Kmet. Hope returns. Justin makes a play with his legs, Herbert gets a TD called back on another questionable penalty.

Bears fightback from 1st and 20, and eventually end a 5 minute, 80-yard drive with a Mooney receiving touchdown. Bears down 3, but Rodgers gets the ball back, hooks up with Adams for a 40-yard completion after a couple of thwarted runs, and ultimately rolls out to the near side of the field for the game-winning touchdown.

Seemed like he was holding on to that one since his first scramble in the first quarter. He discount double checks in the end zone, berates the fans in a video you’ll see forever, and that’s pretty much it.

The Bears show some fight but just don’t have enough yet. Next week they travel to Tampa (who have 10 days of rest) next week. 

This is fine.

Bengals vs Packers: Week 5 Preview

Bengals vs Packers
  • Date: Sunday, October 10
  • Time: 1:00 pm EST
  • TV: FOX (WXIX 19 Cincinnati, WGRT 45 Dayton)
  • Radio: Dan Hoard and Dave Lapham 700 WLW, 1530 ESPN, 102.7 WEBN

This week’s Bengals preview is for a game for which Bengals fans have been waiting a long time. One that could make a major difference. The Bengals and Packers don’t play each other often. These teams rarely finish in the same spot in their division, so typically they only play once every four years.

That said, in recent years, the Bengals are 3-1 all-time against Aaron Rodgers. That history won’t make much of a difference this time around as only P Kevin Huber and LS Clark Harris were around last time the Bengals beat the Packers in 2013.

Both teams currently lead their division, but only one was supposed to be here. That team, the Green Bay Packers, enters the game as 3.5 point favorites on the road. This Bengals preview, on the other hand, covers a team looking to prove themselves with a win over a team many consider to be a Super Bowl contender.

The Story So Far:

At 3-1, the Green Bay Packers have largely overcome their disastrous Week 1 blowout by the hands of the New Orleans Saints. Since then, the Packers have trounced the Detroit Lions, survived a comeback attempt by the San Francisco 49ers, and handily beaten the Pittsburgh Steelers. Through those games, quarterback Aaron Rodgers has thrown eight touchdowns and no interceptions, and has posted an average passer rating of 118.2.

The Cincinnati Bengals are still looking for respect across the NFL, despite the same 3-1 record as the Packers. Fair or not, the national audience is still not sure what to make of them, considering their strength of victory so far. The opponents the Bengals have defeated are a combined 2-10 right now, and the one team they lost to is a very sketchy looking 2-2 Chicago Bears team. No one is going to blame the Bengals if they lose this week, but they’ll need to win to legitimize their record in the eyes of many.

Strengths/Weaknesses

Green Bay Packers

Strengths: As long as the Packers have Aaron Rodgers and Davante Adams, they’ll have a strong offensive attack. Both players have a strong argument as the very best players at their respective positions. The two have combined for an average of 93.3 yards per game, 19 first downs, and a touchdown. Rodgers, in particular, seems to have a sixth sense about him when pressure is coming in the backfield, so actually bringing him down before he makes an insane throw could be difficult whether the Bengals’ defensive line gets pressure or not. Their pass rush has also been above average this season, totaling 33 quarterback hurries on the season.

Weaknesses: The Packers rank near the bottom of the league in passing touchdowns allowed (10), sacks (7), and first down percentage allowed (51.1 percent passing, 30.5 percent rushing). Their rushing game is also not performing particularly well with a measly 3.6 yards per carry and a 20.0 first down percentage on the ground.

Cincinnati Bengals

Strengths: Quarterback Joe Burrow has been called a young Aaron Rodgers by many. Particularly, by former Packers Pro Bowl defensive tackle Mike Daniels, who has been in Cincinnati during both of Burrow’s seasons. On the season, Burrow has recorded a 113.8 passer rating with 988 yards and nine touchdowns in just four games. His steely, confident demeanor has been a huge reason why the Bengals have won three of their four games this season, and almost came back to beat Chicago in Week 2. Much like the Packers, the Bengals’ pass rush has also been stellar so far this season. They’ve notched 45 QB hurries and 13 sacks so far.

Weaknesses: Although it has improved from last year, the Bengals’ pass blocking has been inconsistent and downright frustrating at times. It’s a pretty strong emphasis for this Bengals preview, especially with Pro Bowl DT Kenny Clark on the other side. Tackles Jonah Williams and Riley Reiff have generally been consistently good this year, but there is still a lot of inconsistency in the interior. Rookie RG Jackson Carman appears to be able to hold his own in place of the injured Xavier Su’a-Filo, and LG Quinton Spain is starting to come along in recent weeks, but C Trey Hopkins has largely struggled on the year after coming back from a torn ACL in January. There have also been some issues with tackling on the defensive side of the ball. Their 36 missed tackles on the season have been a blight on an otherwise stifling defense.

Injury Report

Cincinnati Bengals

The biggest injury news for this Bengals preview is the players they are expecting to get back. FS Jessie Bates III, WR Tee Higgins, and CB Chidobe Awuzie all missed last week’s game. But, they have been practicing and appear to be on pace to play against the Packers. LB Akeem Davis-Gaither, CB Trae Waynes, C Trey Hopkins and DT Larry Ogunjobi all have new injuries. But, they also seem to be on pace to play, which is useful information for this Bengals preview.

Unfortunately, RB Joe Mixon is a new addition to the injury report. He’s listed as “Questionable” on Friday’s injury report, but he hasn’t practiced all week. It sounds like they’re waiting to make a final decision on his injury status based on how he does on Saturday, when he is expected to practice. Still, the Bengals are going into this game remarkably healthy, which could be a significant advantage.

Green Bay Packers

Let’s go ahead and address the elephant in the room. The Packers’ already porous secondary isn’t looking good heading into this week. Although they haven’t said whether he’s out for the year, we know stud cornerback Jaire Alexander won’t play this week. CB2 Kevin King was limited with a concussion most of this week, although he is expected to play. Against the Bengals’ elite trio of wide receivers, this could turn into a massive mismatch.

There’s also concerns about injuries to the Packers’ offensive line. Pro Bowl left tackle Elgton Jenkins missed practice on Wednesday and was limited the rest of the week with an ankle injury. He’s officially “questionable”, but you wonder how effective he will be if he does play. Backup right tackle Dennis Kelly missed practice on Thursday and Friday with an undisclosed illness and is also questionable. Rookie starting center Josh Meyers is officially not playing. It could be a rough week for the Packers at certain vulnerable position groups, especially considering those position groups happen to line up with some of the Bengals’ biggest strengths.

Keys to the game

  1. Make Rodgers sweat 

For as much magic as Aaron Rodgers can make, on the whole he hasn’t performed well against consistent pressure this season. In fact, his passer rating is a pedestrian 85.1 when blitzed and a dismal 39.7 when pressured. Compare this to Joe Burrow, whose passer rating only drops to 70.0 when pressured and actually dynamically increases to 133.3 when blitzed.

  1. Let it rip 

In addition to already being one of the Packers’ biggest weaknesses, their secondary will be missing a key player. In particular – Jaire Alexander, who is currently hoping to avoid season-ending surgery. You wonder how the Packers are going to be able to cover Higgins, Boyd, Chase, Uzomah, and possibly Chris Evans. A strong emphasis on the passing game this week could pay dividends.

  1. Don’t give Rodgers time at the end

You absolutely can not allow Aaron Rodgers an opportunity to drive down the field at the end of the game. Two weeks ago, the 49ers became the latest victims of his unbelievable clutch gene. If it’s a close game and the Bengals have the ball near the end of the game, they’ll need to make sure they close it out with proper clock management. It doesn’t matter if the Packers need a field goal or a touchdown at the end of the game. Aaron Rodgers will find a way to make it happen the way he has SO many times in his legendary career.

Final Thoughts:

This week’s Bengals preview possible makes the outcome of this game seem more dire than it really is. Nobody is going to blame the Bengals for failing to come away with a win this week against the Packers. That is, assuming they don’t get blown out. But, the Bengals have an opportunity to make an absolute statement this week. Regardless of the injuries, the Packers are a Super Bowl contender. This win would signal the Bengals are for real and the rebuild is paying off. Make no mistake, they don’t have much to lose, but they have so much to gain.

Mock Packers Off-Season 1.0

Tommy Gilligan-USA TODAY Sports

Even though the 2021 NFL Season just started, it is never too early to talk about the offseason. Here is a mock Packers off-season for your reading pleasure.

Most of us know that teams do this stuff all through out the season. They work many different scenarios to prepare themselves for the offseason and also to work out their plan A, B, C, etc… Now obviously these change throughout the season due to injuries, trades, resigning’s, etc… So I will periodically update this through out the season and the coming off season to give you guys an idea of what the Packers are probably planning. Its too soon to go through the probably 50 plans they have right now so I will just go over what I think are the top two.

The cap numbers I will present in this article are not exact. They are ball park/rounding up or down. This is just to give an idea what the plan could be. I did use cap numbers from overthecap.com. You could also look up Ken Ingallas on twitter at twitter.com/keningalls

Heading into the 2022 season the Packers are projected to be about 40 million over the cap. So to get under here are the moves I feel the Packers will do.

Trades:

Trade Aaron Rodgers post 6/1. This will give them a cap relief of about 27 million.

Cuts:

Preston Smith pre June 1 which saves 7.25 million. Billy Turner post June 1 which nets them another 3.14 million. Kevin King post June 1 as well, which saves them another 750k. Marcedes Lewis which saves 2.08 million. Dean Lowry which takes off another 2.1 million and Randall Cobb which saves about 2.8 million.

Extentions:

I feel the Packers will extend Jaire Alexander, Adrian Amos, and Za’Darius Smith to the maximum salary cap savings for 2022, than take a big hit on ’23 and ’24 when the cap is expected to go up a lot. The most they can save on Z is 12.2, Jaire would be 10.64, and Amos would be 6 million.

Free Agents:

I feel in this scenario they let Issac Yiadom, Tyler Lancaster, MVS, Lucas Patrick, Oren Burks, De’Vondre Campbell(he is technically under contract), Dennis Kelly, Robert Tonyan, Will Redmond.

They resign Davante Adams, Allen Lazard(who is a restricted free agent) and any other lower tier free agents and or restricted free agents like Bojorquez, Nijman, Malik Taylor, Dafney, Black, etc…

Before those signings they would have about 26 million in cap space, which seems like a decent amount; but its not. You need space for your draft class, undrafted free agents, your practice squad, and any restricted free agents as well. You also want to leave yourself a few million of space in season in case you need to sign a free agent due to injuries or move a few guys up from the PS to the active roster. Davante and Lazard would take up most of the space. There would probably be a few million let to sign one or two lower tier free agents like a Dennis Kelly or De’Vondre Campbell level player. They would not have the space to sign Tonyan or MVS unless they did more restructuring.

Draft:

With that being the roster entering the draft this would be how I would think Gutekunst would approach the draft.

29. Zion Nelson, OT, Miami-Fl

Right tackle of the future. His style of player. Young, athletic with tons of upside. Could move to left tackle down the line.

61. Deslin Alexandre, DT, Pittsburgh

Clark needs more help. Slaton helps against the run. They need more help getting after the QB.

93. George Pickens, WR, Georgia

Pickens is MVS’ replacement. He’s not not as purely physically talented, but he has higher upside. Way better hands. He needs a lot of work on his release package. Perfect guy to learn from in Adams. If he develops he’s a #1 receiver.

129.Charlie Kolar, TE, Iowa State

Replacement for Tonyan. Similar skill set. Great hands. OK blocker. Good route runner. Decent athlete.

161. Amari Gainer, LB, Florida State

Athletic freak to replace Campbell as the weakside backer. He could be the dime backer by year two.

196. Joey Porter Jr., CB, Penn State

Perfect fit for the star spot. He can play inside, outside, safety, defend the run, can even blitz a little. Has good size too. Like a poor mans Charles Woodson.

224. Zamir White, RB, Georgia

Freakish explosion. Could return kicks and is just a value pick.

Second option:

Everything is the same as above but Davante walks and they resign both Lazard and MVS.

28. George Pickens, WR, Georgia

Lazard and MVS are both great #2/#3 receivers but neither is a true #1. This mock draft didn’t fall the way the last one did. Receivers went a lot earlier.

60.Nicholas Petit-Frere, OT, Ohio State

Similar to Nelson. Athletic freak with tons of upside. Last year was his first as a starter.

92. Amari Gainer, LB, Florida State

Same as above

130. Arnold Ebiketie, EDGE, Penn State

another athletic freak with upside. Packers will need a 3rd pass rusher.

135. Bubba Bolden, S, Miami

Packers finally get their 3rd safety. High RAS guy. Lots of upside, still a bit inconsistent.

170. LaRon Stokes, IDL, Oklahoma

Similar to Alexandre. a DL to help with the pass rush.

206. Jammie Robinson, CB, Florida State

South Carolina transfer that has upside.

219. Trey McBride, TE, Colorado State

Blocking TE with some receiving upside to replace Marcedes.

248. Zacch Pickens, IDL, South Carolina

Another DL with upside

Tua Tagovailoa is Developing Right Before Our Eyes

Miami selected QB Tua Tagovailoa in the 2020 NFL Draft, and his rookie season was up and down. But he is taking the strides needed to become a franchise QB.

22.

That’s the number of starting quarterbacks the Miami Dolphins have started since Dan Marino retired in 2000.

Names like Jay Fiedler, Dante Culpepper, Chad Pennington, Ryan Tannehill and Jay Cutler bring back painful memories for fans who were searching for Miami’s next franchise QB.

But number 22, 2020 first round pick Tua Tagovailoa, feels different than the rest.

After an up and down rookie campaign where he went 6-3 as the starter but was pulled in 2 starts, Tagovailoa’s future in Miami was questioned.

The prospect of trading for established QB’s such as Deshaun Watson, Russell Wilson, and Aaron Rodgers spread through the media like wildfire. Analysts were questioning Tua’s physical tools, believing that he didn’t have what it takes to play on the pro level. Every time a QB looked to be available, Miami was instantly named a top destination.

But through the controversy, Tagovailoa remained locked in on his craft.

Rehab

The first step in improving his game was getting back to the shape Tua was in when he was at Alabama.

Coming off of major hip surgery in 2019, Tagovailoa didn’t have the opportunity to train during the offseason. Instead, he had to do rehabilitation work on his hip, just to get to a level in which he could play in 2020.

But 2021 is a different story.

Working with renowned trainer Nick Hicks of PER4ORM gym, the former Alabama QB has been able to get to a condition beyond what he was in college.

Tua Tagovailoa has been working with Per4orm this offseason.

With the physical strength that Tagovailoa has been able to amass, the expectation is that he should be much stronger with his throwing motion. This seems to be working, as we have seen clips from camp of the second year QB making several deep passes, something he didn’t do much of in 2020.

Mental Leap

On top of his physical rehab, Tua Tagovailoa wanted to improve his processing, progression through reads, grasp of the playbook, and getting the ball out quicker.

As Tagovailoa stated in a press conference, he wasn’t fully comfortable with former Offensive Coordinator Chan Gailey’s playbook. While much of that comes from the playbook not being a fit for his skillset, he still put maximum effort towards learning his new scheme, under George Godsey and Eric Studesville.

Chemistry and Accuracy

Along with learning the playbook, Tua was working on his chemistry with weapons, new and old. Going to the fields with guys such as Will Fuller, DeVante Parker, Albert Wilson, and Mack Hollins, Tagovailoa truly used the offseason to his advantage, gaining knowledge of the intricacies of his receiver’s game’s. Whether it’s their timing, route tree, where they want the ball, or just getting to know them, Tagovailoa has put effort into having strong relationships with his receivers.

This relationship is starting to show in both training camp and preseason. Tagovailoa’s accuracy, which stood out in college, looks second to none, and is improving as he figures out his receivers. He has been able to put the ball on them in stride, where they can make plays.

Tua Tagovailoa was throwing with precision, leading to YAC opportunities.

Similarly to what Tua did at Alabama, he has become the point guard of this Miami offense, putting pocket passes in the hands of guys who can make plays, like speedster Will Fuller, who has taken notice.

Will Fuller is impressed with Tua Tagovailoa’s accuracy.

Pocket Presence

Although Tua has made strides in categories such as accuracy and strength, few have been has big as his pocket presence. Known for making plays at Alabama, we saw flashes in Tagovailoa’s rookie year (such as the Cardinals game). Unlike previous Dolphins QB’s, his ability to see the pass rush before it gets to him looks like an elite trait, and it seems to have only gotten better in the preseason.

Tua Tagovailoa scrambles against the Cardinals.

On several occasions against the Falcons, Tagovailoa was able to make a subtle move and proceed to deliver a strike. His eyes remained up, even though the pocket was collapsing around him, and he was able to make the correct read. Even with many of his snaps coming against pressure, he was still able to put up impressive numbers.

Tua Tagovailoa makes an impressive throw with pressure coming in.
Tua Tagovailoa was great against pressure against the Falcons.

Although this ability was one that we knew Tua had in him, it’s impressive to see it as he returns to the “Tuscaloosa Tua” that we saw in college.

Brian Baldinger breaks down Tua Tagovailoa.

Leadership

Although the physical traits are flashing on film and in practice, the MOST important developments that we have seen from him are newfound senses of confidence and leadership.

In 2020, it seemed like things were largely set up for a lack of confidence from the rookie QB. He was coming off of major hip surgery, he had a COVID-19 shortened offseason, his offensive coordinator ran a scheme he didn’t feel comfortable with, and the QB who was supposed to mentor him was put in twice to replace him.

But 2021 is a different year, and largely, a different Tua. Teammates and coaches have raved about how confident he is in the offense, and how willing he is to lead, and it has shown in the preseason. He has taken more shots down the field, and has even implemented some elements into Miami’s offense.

Tua Tagoviloa pressed the issue of getting to the line quickly.
Tua has an instructional conversation with Jaylen Waddle and Jakeem Grant.

As stated before, he had also arranged meetings with his teammates during the offseason, citing the need to get a better understanding of the offense.

Tua Tagovailoa works with his receivers during this offseason.

It looks like this taking of initiative is working, as countless teammates have spoken on rallying behind him and their willingness to play with him.

Mike Gesicki cites Tua’s leadership skills.

2021 and Beyond

Although Miami has had struggles with the Quarterback position in the past, Tua Tagovailoa is looking be the outlier. His willingness to get better, physically, mentally, and as a leader is something Dolphins fans haven’t seen since Dan Marino hung up the cleats in 2000.

Thus far, it looks like Tua is taking the strides we expected when he was selected in 2020, and we can only hope they continue into the season. But if Tagovailoa keeps putting in the work he has this offseason, then QB number 22 will finally be the savior Dolphins fans believe him to be.

Another Year to Re-define Seahawks Football

The Seattle Seahawks have had a rough couple years trying to re-define their old stereotypes and be the team they can be. After losing to the Patriots on what could be, The worst play call of all-time, the Seahawks have yet to fully bounce back. Going on almost six years since that point in time, and nothing has changed since that point. Russell Wilson being the quarterback of the Seahawks seems to be the only thing that is working right, but it has yet to be enough. With some help over the course of free agency, trades, and the draft, they are looking to bring a title back to Seattle in what could be, the most difficult year of Russel’s career.

The Seattle Seahawks have their guy, but his time in the league is closing down each year they wait to truly make a push. With recent developments on the offensive side of the ball, and the defensive side of the ball, they are going to make the push for the Super Bowl yet again. The Seahawks had multiple seasons in the NFC east that was incredibly easy, this year won’t be anywhere close to that. After the off-season that the Rams had, the potential bounce-back of the 49ers, and the Cardinals, the Seahawks are going to have quite the road ahead of them. However, where do expectation lie within the Seahawks organization and fan-base will be something to consider as well.

After getting into the playoff’s last season, and Russell having a great season, it’s clear that they are still in win now mode. With that being said, they will be looking to take on some of the toughest teams in the NFC this year that will lead to a lot of gruesome battle’s ahead. There is a chance that with that being in perspective that the Seahawks may not even make the playoff’s this year. In a win now situation, the Seahawks are not lacking offensive weapons with Chris Carson, D.K. Metcalf, and Tyler Lockett, they have one of the best offenses in football. So what could potentially hold them back? The answer is actually extremely simple, their defense.

The Seahawks office has tried to do a lot of different things to help keep teams off the score-board, but when you draft as poorly as they do, they need to do a lot more than just that. Looking at some of the players they have drafted over the past couple seasons: Jordyn Brooks in the first round, Deejay Dallas, Freddie Swain, L.J. Collier, Cody Barton, and a lot more. Now some of the names mentioned weren’t necessarily ‘bad picks’ but the value of the picks makes the picks bad. When looking to become a true contender, it starts with developing players through the draft process, not just through trades and free agency. That idea and concept has seemed to be lost on them, and it needs to be corrected.

Looking at what the Rams, 49ers, and Cardinals have done throughout the course of the last couple seasons, the Seahawks team doesn’t even hold a candle to them. With a head coach that has been holding them back for years, there has yet to be any growth within their team. As a defensive minded head coach, you would expect a good defense… that’s not the case. The Seahawks have had a rough go lately, but that doesn’t come as a surprise when your team selects L.J. Collier and Jordyn Brooks with their first round picks. Making selections like the two I just mentioned is going to be a big problem going forward. You need to have players on your defense who are leaders, but who can also perform, and unfortunately they don’t. So what can they do to change that?

Well at this point in time, there isn’t much they can do, but this off-season is a different story. Looking at their previous draft selections and the development of their draft picks, it’s not unlikely there could be a coaching change. There is only one thing that seems to be a problem each and every year since 2015, Pete Carroll. For those Seahawks fans who follow football, think back to the situation with Earl Thomas. Even while being a beloved fan of the Seahawks, he ended up wanting out due to the coaching and how the team was ran. It’s easy to say that he was just being a baby, but if that was the case, why haven’t they made a run for the Super Bowl since 2015? If they want to win again, they need to let Carrol go.

Alongside letting Carrol go, they should also look to bring in help on the positions of need. With money tied up into only a couple players, they should still be looking to bring in talent to help Wagner, Adams, and Wilson. Wilson has to be prepared to run for hundreds of yards each and every game due to horrendous offensive-line play. How can a quarterback make smart choices with the ball when he has be running outside the pocket for just about every play? The answer is he can’t. When teams started blitzing, like the Cardinals, you could see the decline from that point on. The Seahawks should be taking a note or two from the Chiefs off-season this past year.

The Chiefs had Mahomes run 500 yards in the Super Bowl due to offensive-line play, so what did they do? They signed offensive-linemen to help protect their quarterback. Russell Wilson can be considered by most a top five quarterback in the NFL despite always having to run for his life. If the Seahawks front office was able to take into consideration what it would mean to the organization if they could protect Wilson, they’d be so much better off. That start to any good organization is to make sure you build a team around your quarterback to: Keep him happy, and make sure he can be the best player he can be. There are a lot of problems within the organization, but the fact that they have not gone out to get him some protection shows how little they care about him.

Next, if you go back to the beginning of the off-season you can probably recall about Russ and the organization being in disputes about his role. As the leader, and heart and soul of the team, he felt as though he should be consulted and have an opinion in decisions. With that being said, normally I’d say that isn’t his role on the team but after years of playing with the organization, he felt disrespected. Which can you blame him? His job as the quarterback is to be the leader, but how can you win with a team who doesn’t help you out? It’s the same thing Rodgers had going on this off-season as well. As the quarterback, you should have a say in who you are going to have on your team and players you think would be a fit in the organization.

There are a lot of things that will result in the outcome of the Seahawks this season, but with the roster they have right now, they are going to be in for a tough season. It’ll take a lot of great situational coaching and great play calling, but it is obtainable. Russell is a great leader, and having him under center puts the Seahawks in a great position.