New England Patriots and RAS

The New England Patriots RAS score is in the good hands of Bill Belichick’s dog Nike.
(Credit: The Boston Globe)

The New England Patriots bring us back to the realm of RAS, or Relative Athletic Score. This team remains an interesting one from the front office perspective. Bill Belichick has been the head coach/GM of the Patriots since he was hired in 2000. He had split some of the duties with Scott Pioli before he left, but Belichick was still the head guy with final say. With all that being said, there is no reason to go back to 2000. Draft strategies change, so we’ll look back to 2016.

You can find previous parts here: https://atbnetwork.com/author/bmaafi1125/

Quarterbacks:

Generally quarterbacks and RAS scores are kind of unimportant outside of maybe a team here or there. Most teams want a guy who can at least move around the pocket a little and could get a few yards if a play breaks down.

With that, let’s take a look at the Patriots. Since 2016 they have drafted four quarterbacks: Jacoby Brissett, Danny Etling, Jarrett Stidham, and Mac Jones. Etling was the most athletic with a 8.31 RAS score and Brissett was the lowest with a 4.53. All four average out to a 6.38, which ironically enough rates average overall.

In fact, it’s a pretty common average; most teams are around there or slightly higher. All four have been at least 6’2 and 217+ pounds. Essentially, New England likes solid sized QBs, which is also pretty normal among NFL teams.

Running backs:

The running backs for the Patriots are kind of interesting. Belichick has drafted only three since 2016: Sony Michel, Damien Harris, and Rhamondre Stevenson. Michel had the highest RAS score of the three at 8.96, but Harris and Stevenson both rated under 6.5.

At this position, it would seem overall athleticism is not that important to Belichick. All have similar size (between 5’10”-5’11” and 214-230), yet they don’t have any testing numbers that stand out. For example, Michel was the fastest of the three in the 40-yard-dash, clocking in at 4.54. So it would reason pure speed is not that important to them, especially since they all demonstrate average agility.

Tight Ends:

Since 2016 Bill Belichick has drafted only three tight ends: Ryan Izzo, Dalton Keene, and Devin Asiasi. All three are 6’3″-6’4″ and weigh between 253-257. Just going off this, and given the former Gronk factor, the Patriots like larger tight ends. As for RAS scores, this position once again rates average overall at 6.66.

Keene is a freak athlete with a 9.34 RAS score, but Izzo and Asiasi are both in the below/average range. It does look like they want tight ends with decent speed as Asiasi and Keene both run in the low 4.7’s. They all test at least average in explosion factor. All three are average to excellent in their 10-yard splits, so this might be something to watch.

Wide Receivers:

They Patriots have drafted five receivers since 2016: Malcolm Mitchell and Devin Lucien in 2016, Braxton Berrios in 2018, N’Keal Harry in 2020, and Tre Nixon in 2021. The average RAS score of them is a solid 7.58. Even better, three of the five are above an 8.0. Four of them measure between 6’0″-6’3″ and weigh 187+, with two of them currently over 200 pounds.

Outside of Berrios, they seem to prefer bigger receivers. They appear to factor in vertical jump as four of the five registered a 36″ vertical or higher. 40-yard-dash speed does seem to be something they key in as well. Harry was the slowest at 4.53, while the others were under 4.5, including three in the 4.45 range. Four of the five also scored at least average in agility testing.

Offensive Line:

One position the Patriots have made sure not to avoid is definitely offensive line. They have drafted 11 offensive linemen since 2016. Seven of them were interior offensive linemen, specifically guards. There was a solid average RAS score of 7.15. The guards even averaged a 7.51.

tackles:

The tackles averaged a 6.66, but that was mostly brought down by Justin Herron’s 3.99. The other two tackles were Antonio Garcia (7.29) and Conor McDermott (8.7). As to their size, the tackles varied from 6’4″-6’8″, but their weights did not show a lot of variety; they ranged from 302-312.

Arm length seemed to vary from 33 1/3″ – 34 3/4″. Explosion grades were at least average, while 40 and 10-yard splits were all average to a little slow. Agility testing does not seem to be something that they value at tackle; while two had poor agility testing, McDermott tested well.

guards:

The guards heights vary from 6’3″-6’5″, but weight wise there was a lot more variety. The lightest was Dustin Woodward at 295 and the heaviest was Michael Onwenu at 344. Another area that had a big range was arm length, which was between 31 1/4″-34 1/3″.

All of the guards tested at least average in explosion testing, specifically the broad jump. Speed does not seem to be a priority; the 40 speeds range from 4.95-5.34. As to agility testing, it seems that they prefer at least average agility. Only one drafted guard tested poorly in this area: Ted Karras.

Defensive line:

From 2016 to 2021, New England has drafted only three defensive linemen: Vincent Valentine, Byron Cowart, and Christian Barmore. The three of their RAS scores average out to a 6.6. They all do have similar height (6’3″ or 6’4″), while weight varies a bit from Cowart’s 298 to Valentine’s 329. It does look like they value arm length in their DL; the shortest is 33 1/8″ and longest is 34 3/4″.

There’s no explosion testing from Barmore, but Cowart and Valentine tested well, especially on the broad jump. Straight line speed does not seem to a priority here. Barmore ran fast, but his 10-yard split was just average. Meanwhile, Cowart and Valentine did not run well. All three had average to poor agility testing, so that might not be a priority either.

Edge:

Since 2016 the Patriots have drafted six edge defenders: Derek Rivers and Deatrich Wise (2017), Chase Winovich (2019), Anfernee Jennings and Josh Uche (2020), and Ronnie Perkins (2021). There are only RAS scores for four, and they collectively average out to an athletic 7.9. There does not seem to be any threshold on height with Uche at 6’1″ and Wise at 6’5″.

A similar feature comes from weight – Uche was the lightest at 245 and Wise being the heaviest at 278. Outside of Wise, they appear to trend more on the light side; the rest are between 245 and 256. Arm length does seem somewhat important to them; the shortest arms tested were 32 7/8″ with Wise the longest at 35 5/8″.

They do seem to have a threshold as far as explosion testing, as all of them tested at least average or above. Straight line speed does seem to have some importance to them. Outside of Wise, everyone ran a 4.7 or faster with two running 4.6. They also seem to like guys with good or better agility.

Linebackers:

The Patriots have drafted five linebackers since 2016. Despite this, only three of them have RAS scores. The average RAS score of those three is a pretty solid 7.04. Height wise, they seem to like shorter linebackers, with all between 5’11” and 6’1″. There is some range in weight (two guys at 234 and the the other 248).

Arm length does not seem to be particularly important to them, ranging from 31 1/2″ to 32 1/4″. There does seem to be something to them liking their linebackers with decent speed as they all ran sub-4.75 in the 40-yard-dash. Their agility testing is average, though explosive testing isn’t of importance since they range from bad to very good.

Defensive backs:

The one position the Patriots have loaded up on is defensive back. Since 2016, they’ve drafted eight in this area, with three coming from the safety position. Although this is a trend with most NFL teams, it also seems to be a position where testing scores are more dependent.

The RAS scores on all but one came back with a good average of 8.37. Duke Dawson and Cyrus Jones do bring the average score down a bit; both tested about average (6.62 and 6.45, respectively). If one averaged out strictly the cornerbacks, this score actually drops to a 7.87. Two of the three safeties scored over 9.5, with only Joshuah Bledsoe failing to provide a score.

When it comes to height, three out of the four corners are 5’9″ or 5’10”, so they may have a preference for shorter corners. Of course the fifth is Joejuan Williams, who is 6’4″. With the safeties there is some variety from 5’11” to 6’2″. Weight wise, all eight players ranged from 197 to 217. This position, however, is where explosion testing mattered immensely.

While Cyrus Jones tested poorly, the rest all tested above average to elite. They also seem to like their defensive backs fast, and yes there are teams that do not prioritize it. Outside of Kyle Dugger, all run a 4.49 or faster, while the 10-yard splits are all varied.

In regards to agility drills, the Patriots want their defensive backs to have at least good agility. Of all these players, Duke Dawson was the only one with poor agility scores. Also, the 3-cone drill might be a little more important than short shuttle.

The Buffalo Bills and RAS

Buffalo Bills RAS

Welcome back, Buffalo Bills fans. In the next part of this RAS series, we take a look at Buffalo’s front office and their connections with their draft classes. For those that do not know RAS stands for Relative Athletic Score. It is a system put together by Kent Lee Platte. He assigns scores to each combine test and then combines them to get a 0-10 score that shows how athletic that player is relative to other players at his position.

Historical data has shown that this does effect a players potential, the more athletic a player the higher their potential to reach that elite level of play. You can find his site here: http://ras.football The Bills current GM is Brandon Beane who has been in place since May of 2017, which means the 2018-2021 drafts have been his. Now that is over with lets get to the analysis.

Quarterbacks: A Future MVP Candidate?

Beane has drafted only two quarterbacks in his time. Josh Allen in 2018 and Jake Fromm in 2020. The RAS scores from these two could not be more different. Allen scored a 9.67 and Fromm scored a 1.96. There are not many similarities between the two. Both are 220 or over, and That’s about it. This is something that seems to follow teams across the league. RAS does not seem to be all that important for most teams.

Running backs:

Since 2018 Beane and the Buffalo Bills have drafted only two running backs. Devin Singletary in 2019 and Zack Moss in 2020. The average RAS score for the two of them is 2.31. Which is interesting, because teams generally like their running backs to be at least decent athletes. Some similarities are that both are under 5’10 and both are over 200 pounds.

Both oddly have almost the same 40 times at 4.65 and 4.66. Same thing with their 10 yard splits with a 1.67 and 1.64. So it seems they do not care too much about athleticism with their running backs, although its a small sample size with only two guys.

Wide Receivers:

The Buffalo Bills have drafted five receivers since 2018. Austin Proehl and Ray-Ray McCloud in 2018, Isaiah Hodgins and Gabe Davis in 2020, and Marquez Stevenson in 2021. Looking at their average RAS score what comes out is a 5.45. None of them scored over a 7.56. Only two of them even scored a 6 or above (Davis and Hodgins).

With the Bills draft history it seems Beane prefers two different type of receivers either guys that are 5’9-5’10 like Proehl, McCloud and Stevenson or those that are 6’2+ in Davis and Hodgins. The three smaller receivers all seem to have good agility in common. 40 times range for 4.53-4.48 so they all have about average speed. Their explosion grade are average to below average. These tests are not prioritized by them.

Now when it comes to Hodgins and Davis besides both being 6’2+ they are both over 210. Both scored good in explosion and good with their 10 yard splits. Agility grades vary between the two, so that seems to be not a priority when it comes to bigger receivers for them.

Tight ends:

In his time Beane has drafted only two tight ends. Tommy Sweeney and Dawson Knox in 2019. Sweeney had a RAS score of 5.93 and Knox with a 9.25. Both are 6’4 250-255. Sweeney was pretty average across the board in testing, Knox meanwhile showed really well in explosion and speed testing, but average agility. Speed and explosion seem to be testing that they key in on.

Offensive line:

The Buffalo Bills have drafted five offensive linemen since 2018. Three guards and two tackles. Wyatt Teller in 2018, Cody Ford in 2019, and Tommy Doyle, Jack Anderson and Spencer Brown in 2021. The average RAS score for all of them is a very athletic 8.72 with only one of them scoring under an 8.

This seems to be a position that they highly value athleticism. As for the two tackles very similar athletic profiles. Both are 6’8 and 310+. They both had RAS scores of 9.9+. Both had very good bench scores for how long their arms are. They both have elite scores in explosion, speed and agility. It seems they really like tall super athletic tackles.

With the three guards all three are 6’4-6’5 and 314+. Their average RAS score is a solid 7.9. So they like their guards to have at least solid explosion numbers. All three have vertical jumps of 28.5+ with a broad jump of 8’08” at least. With their speed grades they are pretty average across the board. Their agility scores vary from average to poor. It seems the Bills do not prioritize agility testing with their guards. Arm length also varies with the shortest being 31 7/8″ and the longest being 36 3/4″

Defensive line:

Since 2018 the Buffalo Bills have only drafted two defensive linemen: Harrison Phillips (2018) and Ed Oliver (2019). Their average RAS score is a exceptional 8.99. They are 6’2-6’3. Their weights though vary with Oliver being 287 and Phillips at 307, so not much to connect there. Both did score high on bench press with Oliver being the lowest with 32 reps. So that might be something to keep an eye on. Both did score high on vert with a score of 32″ or better.

Now with speed they are on almost complete opposite ends. Phillips does have at least an average score on his 10-yard split, so that might be something that the Bills prioritize over 40 speed. Both did score very high in agility though, so that seems to be testing that Beane looks to when it comes to DL.

Edge:

In regards to edge players, the Buffalo Bills have drafted four since 2018: Darryl Johnson (2019), AJ Epenesa (2020), and Gregory Rousseau and Carlos Basham (2021). Their average RAS score is a 6.96. The guy that brings that score down the most is Epenesa with a weak 4.07 which is below average. If you remove his score you get a 7.96, so for the most part they like their edge defenders to be athletic.

Three of the four are 6’5 or taller, also three of the four are 266 or heavier. So it seems they like guys that are taller and a little bit on the heavier side. Oddly enough none of them were able to put up more than 21 reps on the bench. Arm length does not seem to be something they find important, the lengths vary from 32 7/8″ to 34 1/2″. They do not seem to value broad jump, three of the four had jumps under 9’9″ or less. Three of the four though had vertical jumps of at least 32″.

When it comes to speed scores three of the four had 40 times of 4.8 or faster with two of them running sub 4.7. Three of the four had good to great agility scores. Some guys scored well on one test and poor on another. So it seems they just like guys who are taller/bigger and are at least above average overall athletes.

Linebacker:

Now with linebacker Brandon Beane has only drafted two since 2018. Tremaine Edmunds in 2018 and Vosean Joseph. These two ended up on completely different ends of the spectrum. Joseph’s RAS score was a paltry .22, and Edmunds was an elite 9.74.

Neither scored high on the broad jump and Edmunds didn’t do the vertical jump. So it seems they may not prioritize that testing. Joseph did not do any speed testing and Edmunds did not do any agility testing. So outside of that there isn’t much data to go off.

Defensive backs:

Brandon Beane has drafted six defensive backs in his time as the GM of the Buffalo Bills: four corners and two safeties. Their average RAS score is a mediocre 5.94. Two of the guys drafted really bring that average down. Jaquan Johnson with a 3.46 and Dane Jackson with a 4.44, all the rest scored a 6.29 or higher.

Now in regards to the corners. All of them are either 5’11 or 6’0, so they seem to like average to above average height in their corners. The lightest was Jackson at 187, with the heaviest being Siran Neal at 206. So it can be said they prefer their corners in the 190ish+ range.

When it comes to explosive testing they vary from poor to elite so I would not put too much stock in this testing mattering for the Bills front office. We can say thought that they do not prioritize agility testing, all of their testing ranges from poor to about average. Speed testing does not seem to be a priority either with three of the guys running 4.53, 4.57, 4.56, and the fourth running just a 4.5 flat.

With the safeties as far as size goes it does not seem they value big body types, with Johnson being 5’10 190 and Damar Hamlin being 6’0 7/8ths 200. Both did put up 18 reps on the bench press. Both scored pretty average with explosion testing with 9’10” and a 10’1″ broad jumps and 33″ and 35″ vertical jumps. Johnson had a poor 40 time of 4.69 and Hamlin a average 4.6. Also interesting is both had identical 20-yard splits of 2.69. Both also scored average composite agility scores.

Final Thoughts

The Bills are kind of hard to pin point with athletic testing and RAS scores. They are kind of in the middle with most of the players they have drafted. With running backs you can say athleticism isn’t a high priority with their front office. As to wide receivers they seem to have two different types, slot sized guys and tall vertical type receivers.

When it comes to offensive and defensive line they have a preference for highly athletic players. With your edge players they like guys who are taller 265+ and relatively agile. Defensive backs they are kind of all over the place. Beane seems to like guys that are between 5’11-6’1 and 190+. Outside of that they do not seem to prioritize any athletic testing.

The Seattle Seahawks and RAS

In regards to the Seahawks their front office has been in place since 2010. Trends come and go and front offices sometimes change. We are only going back through the 2016 draft which gives us six years worth of drafts to pull data from. You can also find Kent Lee Platte’s website here: ras.football

Quarterbacks:

The Seahawks have only drafted one quarterback since Russell Wilson, Alex McGough in 2018. So obviously not much to go off there. He did post an RAS score of 7.82.

Running backs:

To the running backs, the Seahawks have drafted 7 since 2016, which equals out to at least one a year. If you average out the scores you get a 6.81, which is only a bit above average. If Look at all the picks though outside of two guys Alex Collins and Deejay Davis they all scored a 7.28 or higher. This shows that overall Schneider and Carroll like their running backs to be relatively athletic. Looking further into the numbers the Seahawks like to draft bigger backs. five of the seven weight 217 pounds or more. They are all between 5’10-6’0. One key seems to be 40 speed. All of the running backs drafted have at least average speed or better.

Six of the seven outside of Alex Collins all scored at least average in explosion. Agility does not seem to be something that Carroll/Schneider emphasize. Three of the seven scored poorly where two only scored average. Going off this data we can say they like bigger backs with good 40 speed and at least average explosion.

Tight end:

Since 2016 the Seahawks have drafted four tight ends. Nick Vanett in 2016, Will Dissly in 2018, and Colby Parkinson and Stephen Sullivan in 2020. Their average RAS scores comes to a very average 5.77. That is mostly brought down by Dissly’s 3.79, although the rest are not all that high either. The highest is Sullivan with a 7.44. All four tight ends weight 250 or more. Interestingly enough they all vary in height. Vannett is 6’6, Dissly is 6’4, Sullivan is 6’5, and Parkinson is 6’7. Three of the four have good to great agility scores.

As for 40 times they do not seem important to the Seahawks. They vary from 4.89 to 4.66. Another interesting thing is three of the four had poor explosion testing. So that seems to be another test they do not find important. Two of them had 33″ arms and the other two had 34 and 35 respectively. So it seems Carroll and Schneider like their tight ends at least 250 and with decent agility scores.

Wide Receiver:

This position is some what interesting. The Seahawks have drafted eight receivers since 2016. The average of those eight is a decent 7.61. The one guy that really brings that grade down is Kenny Lawler, his RAS score was a 2.08. With his score removed the average goes up to 8.39. So it can be surmised that they look for pretty athletic receivers. Looking at the agility scores it seems this is another position that they do not care about agility numbers. Seven of the eight receivers drafted had average to poor agility numbers. Only John Ursua had high level agility scores. The Seahawks front office also seems to prefer receivers over 200 pounds; six of the eight drafted are 200 or over, with even four of the six being 214 or heavier. Five of the eight are over 6’0.

They do seem to prioritize 40 speed. Six of the eight ran 4.45 or faster. Seven of the eight though had a vertical of 35 or better (which is considered about average). Those seven also had broad jump scores of at least 10′ which is considered average, but six of those seven had a broad jump of 10’4″ or better which is considered above average. So it can be said they also prioritize explosion drills. Five of the eight also had above average bench scores. So it seems they like big, physical, explosive but linear fast receivers.

Offensive line:

The Seahawks have drafted eight offensive linemen since 2016. Four tackles, two guards and two centers. The average RAS score of the eight is 6.21. Two of their draft picks really bring the score down. Justin Senior and Jamarco Jones both had sub 1 RAS scores which is terrible, the rest were 7.76 or above. Also right off the bat the Seahawks seem to like bigger offensive linemen. Six of the eight are 310 or heavier, with four of the six being 320+. Their heights are kind of all over from 6’2-6’8, so it does not seem to matter to them. Of the offensive tackles all have had arm length’s of 34″ or more. The interior guys have all been around 33″

We have no testing numbers for Joey Hunt, not even arm measurements. Outside of Jones and Senior the rest all score at least average on explosion testing. As for speed testing, again outside of the two outliers they all tested at least average in speed. The agility testing is all over for them so they must be tests that the Seahawks do not worry about too much when it comes to OL. On the bench testing six of the eight all tested out at least average to very good.

Defensive line:

Since 2016 Carroll/Schneider have only drafted four interior defensive linemen. Jarran Reed in 2016, Nazair Jones and Malik McDowell in 2017, and Demarcus Christmas in 2019. The average RAS score of the four is an even 5. Looking more into those numbers you find that Malik McDowell is the one that really boosts that number up with his score of 9.03. The rest of them are 3.9 or lower. So athleticism does not seem to matter to the Seahawks.

They seem to prefer the linemen on the lighter side. The heaviest one is Reed at 307. Three of the four have a 40 time of 5.11 or faster. Another common factor across the roster is agility scores. They are all either average or below average in agility. Explosion drills are also treated the same.

Edge defenders:

The Seahawks from office has also drafted four edge defenders in the last six drafts. Rasheem Green in 2018, LJ Collier in 2019, Darrell Taylor and Alton Robinson in 2020. Taylor has no testing on file. So the three that do their RAS scores average out to a solid 7.09, mostly brought down by Collier’s 3.25. So none of them are over 6’4 which is kind of interesting. Two of them actually are under 6’3.

The Seahawks like them on the heavier side, the lightest one is 264. Two of them are over 275. All three have average to good testing numbers on the explosive drills. Green and Robinson had 40 times of 4.73 or faster. They both also had average numbers on agility testing. This might be the one position so far that they at least seem to look at agility numbers. There is not much else to go off in regards to this position, other than they seem to like guys who are relatively athletic.

Linebackers:

Linebacker is definably an interesting study in regards to the Seahawks. Schneider and Carroll have drafted five linebackers in six drafts. Jacob Martin and Shaquem Griffin in 2018, Ben Burr-Kirven and Cody Barton in 2019, and Jordyn Brooks in 2020. The average RAS score of four of the five drafted (Jordyn Brooks didn’t test enough to get a score) was a crazy athletic 8.72. So with those numbers we can assume the Seahawks like their linebackers to be elite athletes. With having athletes of this level there is of course a trade off, three of the four are 237 or smaller-with two of them being 230 or less. Also they are not exceptionally tall. Two of them are 6’2 and the other three are 6’0.

One test that definitely stands out is 40 times. They all run a 4.64 or better, with three of the four running a 4.56 or faster. The four that tested in vertical and broad jump all had at least average numbers there. This does seem to be a position that they prioritize agility testing. three of the four that tested put up elite agility testing and the other had a great 3 cone drill but a less than average short shuttle. The Seahawks definably emphasize speed and agility testing here with at least average explosive testing.

Defensive backs:

As for defensive backs they have drafted eight since 2016. Schneider and Carroll have drafted five corners, and three safeties. The Seahawks here are a bit of a mixed bag. Their average score is a slightly above average 6.91. They have two guys with sub 5 scores, but then they have three with scores over 8.3.

In regards to corners they seem to have two different types. They have three corners that were 6’0-6’3 194+ or 5’9 185-200, Tre Flowers is the talled at 6’3 the other two are 6’0-6’1. With the corners the Seahawks drafted they all ran 4.5 40’s or faster. Again they do not seem to care much about agility drills all the corners were average to poor in those drills. Four of the five put up average to above average scores in the vertical jump and broad jump. So it seems size and speed are of importance at corner with at least average testing in the vert and broad jump.

With the safeties all three are 6’0-6’1, but not exceptionally big, Delano Hill was 216 but Thompson is 204 and Marquise Blair is 196. Again explosion and agility testing was poor or average. Tedric Thompson ran a 4.6 but the other two ran sub 4.5, so it seems they emphasize speed at safety with average size for the most part. Somewhat similar thresholds to their corners.

Final Thoughts:

The Seahawks are anther interesting study in regards to what RAS and pro-day/combine testing says about their draft preferences. Roster wide it seems they do not care about agility drills outside of off ball linebacker and Tight end…kind of. They only take highly athletic linebackers. They like big fast receivers. Their defensive linemen are pretty unathletic. Their corners and safeties are held to similar thresholds. Finally they like their offensive linemen bigger guys with average speed and explosion.

Baltimore Ravens and RAS

This next part will focus on the Ravens. As you guys continue to read through this series you will see the connect with RAS and teams drafting strategies are not as easy as saying all teams want to get bigger, faster, stronger. While yes that’s true in a way, but its not that simple.

See my previous parts:

Las Vegas Raiders | San Francisco 49ers | Indianapolis Colts

Teams have different things they are looking for athletically. The Ravens as you will see are kind of different.

Quarterback:

Since Eric DeCosta took over for Ozzie Newsome he has drafted one quarterback. Trace McSorley in 2019. McSorley did it all and came away with a pretty good score of 8.29. But with such limited information there is not much to go off. Ozzie Newsome did draft Lamar Jackson the year before Decosta took over. So you might want to keep an eye on athletic quarterbacks, but I don’t see it as a definitive.

Running backs:

In DeCosta’s three draft classes he has drafted two running backs and one fullback. They drafted Justice Hill in 2019 and J.K. Dobbins in 2020. The lone fullback they drafted is Ben Mason in 2021. In regards to the running backs Hill did put up a score of 9.33. He did not do any agility testing. His speed and explosion numbers were elite. in Dobbins case he did no testing except for height and weight. Interestingly enough both are about 5’9 1/2, although I don’t think that means anything in particular. They both also had over 20 reps on the bench. Again I don’t know if it means much with a small sample size, but interesting none the less.

With Mason he is almost tight end size at 6’3 246. He had great explosion numbers and just ok to average speed and agility numbers. Since he is the only fullback drafted again we can’t take too much from it.

Tight ends:

DeCosta has not drafted a single tight end in his three years, so nothing to go off on here.

Wide Receivers:

In three short years DeCosta has drafted six receivers. He has drafted two receivers in each of the last three drafts. Marques Brown and Miles Boykins in 2019, Devin Duvernay and James Proche in 2020 and Rashod Bateman and Tylan Wallace in 2021. The six of them have an average ras score of 6.93. Wallace and Proche both scored on the low end, both below 5. Three of the other four scored 7.87 or higher. Marques Brown did not do any testing. One thing I can find in common with all the receivers is they scored very fast 10 yard splits. So that looks to be something that the Ravens find important with their receivers.

Pure speed also seems to be of importance to DeCosta. Four of the receivers drafted ran 4.5 or better. Three of those four ran 4.43 or faster. There is no 40 yard dash time on James Proche. Another thing is they do not seem to like exceptionally tall receivers. Outside of Boykins none of the receivers DeCosta has drafted were over 6’0. Four of them were 5’11 or shorter. The agility numbers are all over the place so it seems like the Ravens have no preference there. As for explosive drills they seem to like guys who are at least average or above. Wallace was the only one that tested poorly in those drills.

The weight of the players also stands out. Outside of Marques Brown every receiver weights 190+. Even Brown now is listed at 180. One final thing that stands out about the receivers drafted is arm length. Outside of Proche they all have 30″ arms or longer, and even Proche was close at 29 3/4. Bateman and Boykins both have 33″ arms. It could be said that they do not like receivers with arms that are short at least relatively to their bodies.

Offensive line:

This position is also of interest in regards to the type of players DeCosta has drafted. He has drafted four offensive linemen in his three drafts, and all four are guards. He drafted Ben Powers in 2019, Tyre Phillips and Ben Bredeson in 2020, and finally Ben Cleveland in 2021. Average out their ras scores and you get a very average 5.95. That is mostly due to Cleveland who brings a score of 9.63, Powers and Phillips both scored under 5, Bredeson did not do any testing. Even if you go back to some of Newsome’s recent drafts the offensive linemen did not score high. Guys like Orlando Brown for example.

DeCosta seems to like big strong guys. All four of his drafted guys were 6’4+ and all are above 307. Cleveland and Phillips are 330+. Explosion and agility scores are not important at all for DeCosta and the Ravens. Bredeson did no testing at all. All three that tested were either average or below average. On the agility tests all three tested poorly. Phillips and Cleveland were the only ones who ran the 40 and both were on opposite ends. Bench Press does not seem important either; two of the three could only did 20 and 21 reps respectively.

Defensive line:

In his three drafts DeCosta has drafted three defensive linemen. Daylon Mack in 2019 and Justin Madubuike and Broderick Washington in 2020. Washington did no testing outside of the bench press. Mack scored a 4.16 RAS and Madubuike had a 9.32. It does seem the Ravens prefer shorter/squattier defensive linemen. All three are between 6’1-6’2. Also both Mack and Madubuike had great 10 yard splits, identical 1.73’s. Both also did well on the bench with over 30 reps. Although it is a small sample size we can say they like their defensive linemen on the shorter size and quick fast 10 yard splits.

Edge defenders:

The Ravens have drafted three edge defenders/defensive ends in DeCosta’s reign; Jaylon Ferguson in 2019, Odafe Owah and Daelin Hayes in 2021. The three’s average ras score comes out to a 7.77 which is pretty solid. Ferguson is on the bigger size at 270 where both Owah and Hayes are in the 250’s. All three also have good arm length between 33-34″.

As for RAS Ferguson had the lowest score with a 5.46, Owah was a freak with a 9.92, and Hayes with a solid 7.93. Ferguson had average scores across the board except for agility which were poor. Owah was elite on all testing while Hayes was above average on everything. The number are all over the place, so there is not enough information to get a good idea on what the Ravens look for at the position out side of decent arm length and that they do not emphasize agility drills and they like guys who have at least decent speed.

Linebackers:

DeCosta has drafted only two linebackers in his three drafts. He has drafted both Patrick Queen and Malik Harrison both in 2020. Queen had a RAS of 7.99, which was mostly brought down by his height and weight. Harrison scored a 9.42. Both of them had great scores in explosion. Both of them had broad jumps of 10’2″ or higher. Harrison had the slower 40 but still ran a solid 4.66. Queen did not do agility drills but Harrison did and put up an elite 3 cone time of 6.83 with an average short shuttle of 4.32. Also their 10 yard splits where a 1.64 and 1.58, those are above average to elite.

In regards to linebackers it seems size isn’t important to them, but explosiveness, 10 yard dash, and 40 time as well seem important to them.

Defensive backs:

Eric DeCosta has drafted 4 defensive backs since he became GM in 2019. He has drafted three corners and one Marauder (safety). The average of their four RAS scores is 6.95, which is a little surprising you would think it would have been higher. DeCosta drafted Iman Marshall in 2019, Geno Stone in 2020, and Shaun Wade and Brandon Stephens in 2021. All three corners are 6’1 or just under and all are 192 pounds plus, and 2 out of the three are over 200.

So it can be said that the Ravens front office likes larger corner. Again a theme that seems to play out with all their draft picks is that agility scores are not important to them. Marshall and Stephens had average to poor scores. Shaun Wade did not participate in agility drills. Explosion also seems to be a test they do not find important, of the three corners none have similar scores. Their scores run the gamut from poor to great and in-between. This is one position where the 10-yard splits may not be important. Brandon Stephens had a poor 10-yard split of 1.62. All of their 40 times are 4.53 or faster. So it can be said they like their corners to have at least decent speed.

To Stone the only marauder of the group, his overall speed is decent, and he has decent size at 5’10 207, but had poor explosion grades. This falls in line with the rest of the defensive backs, in that DeCosta does not seem to care about these tests.

Final Thoughts:

The Ravens are very peculiar in regards to their draft picks and athletic testing. It does not seem like they put a huge emphasis on it outside of certain tests. They seem to find 10-yard splits important almost across the board. They like freaky athletic linebackers, big physical corners, Shorter defensive linemen, Big strong offensive linemen, and DeCosta also seems to prefer solid built, but not overly tall wide receivers with good speed.

Las Vegas Raiders and RAS

I have finally gotten the time to get back to working on this project. I only have *checks notes*…18 more teams to go!

I’m not really going in any specific order. I am just picking a team a random that has had their front office in place for at least three drafts.

Next is obviously the Las Vegas Raiders with Mike Mayock as their GM since the 2019 draft. You can also find Kent Lee Platte’s website here: https://ras.football/

Quarterbacks:

This one is super easy. Mayock has not drafted a single quarterback yet. So there is no information to go on yet.

Running backs:

With running backs Mayock has drafted only two in his time with the Raiders. Josh Jacobs and Lynn Bowden. Jacobs RAS was a 5.7 but Bowden did not work out due to recovery from an injury/surgery. So there is not much there to compare. Jacobs is 5’10 and Bowden is just under 5’11. Both are over 200 pounds. Outside of those things there isn’t much else to draw from.

Wide Receivers:

The Raiders have drafted three receivers in the Mayock era, Hunter Renfrow, Bryan Edwards, and Henry Ruggs. Of the three only two have RAS scores. Ruggs of course had a score of 9.55, Renfrow had a score of 2.94; so completely opposite. Ruggs and Renfrow are both smaller receivers. They are both under 190 pounds. The problem is their athletic testing is different or missing. For example Renfrow only did 7 reps on the bench, Ruggs did not bench. Renfrow showed decent agility numbers, where as Ruggs did not do agility drills. The only thing that can maybe be pointed out is their explosive testing. Ruggs had a 41 inch vertical and Renfrow had a decent 35 inch. So besides that and their size there is not much else comparable between them athletically. Edwards did not test at all. He measured 6’2 6/8ths 212 pounds.

Tight Ends:

The Raiders have only drafted one tight end in the last three years, Foster Moreau from LSU. He scored high on the RAS scale with a 9.47. Showed decent size at 6’4 253. Overall he was fast, quick and explosive.

Offensive Line:

With the offensive line Mayock has only drafted three, John Simpson in ’20, Alex Leatherwood and Jimmy Morrissey in ’21. Interestingly enough he has drafted one at each position, a tackle, a guard and a center. Now here is where we can see some connections. The RAS scores of all three are 8.53, 9.69, and 9.13. So it can be said that Mayock likes his offensive linemen to be highly athletic. The only real difference in their athletic testing is John Simpson’s agility numbers, they were poor. Otherwise though all their numbers graded out as good to elite. All three had great explosive testing.

Defensive line:

Just like quarterback, very easy. Mayock has not drafted a single defensive lineman in his three years as the GM.

Edge/Defensive end:

The Raiders have drafted three edge defenders since 2019, Maxx Crosby and Clelin Ferrell in ’19, and Malcolm Koonce in ’21. Now the problem here is only once of them has a RAS; Maxx Crosby with and elite 9.65 score. Now looking at the size of them Mayock seems to prefer edge defenders who are smaller-average size. Koonce is on the smaller side at 6’2 250, Crosby is a little bigger at 6’5 255 and Ferrell is the biggest at 6’4 264. With koonce there is no workout data on, he was seen as a relatively athletic rusher. Crosby had elite scores at everything. Ferrell’s agility numbers were good, but he had no other testing. So there is not enough data to go on right now, other than they don’t like the big edge defenders who can slide inside on occasion. Other than that there is much else to extrapolate.

Linebacker:

Mike Mayock has drafted three linebackers in his time with the Raiders, Quinton Bell in 2019, Tanner Muse in 2020, and Divine Deablo in 2021. Muse and Bell both tested out over 9.5 on the RAS scale, Deablo was not far behind with a 8.14. It can be said that Mayock likes drafting highly athletic linebackers. The three of them are 6’2-6’3 and also under 240 pounds as well. All ran very fast 40 times. Bell ran a 4.53 and Muse ran a 4.41, Deablo ran a 4.45. All three also put up at least 19 bench press reps. While it is a small sample size for now at least it can be said Mayock likes slightly undersized super athletic linebackers. He also likes moving big safeties to linebacker having done it with both Muse and Deablo.

Defensive backs:

Now here is where it gets interesting. Mayock a former defensive back himself has drafted a total of 8 defensive backs in 3 years! It is an important position, so most teams will draft a number of them but almost an average of 3 every draft? that is a lot. It is also pretty evenly spread out. The Raiders have drafted 5 corners and 3 safeties. Now only two of the nine do not have RAS scores. The rest all scored 6.26 or above. That score belongs to safety Tyree Gillespie, after him though the lowest was another safety Johnathan Abram with a 7.4 and Trevon Moehrig with a 7.37. The average RAS score of all the safeties that Mayock has draft is a 7.29, so above average definitely, but not elite.

The three safeties are between 5’11 and just over 6’0. They all also weight between 202-207. With the safties it seems like explosiveness has less of an emphasis. They seem to prioritize speed more. All three run a 4.52 or faster. All three tested poorly in explosive testing and average or poor in agility testing.

If you just count the cornerbacks the lowest was Trayvon Mullen with a 7.46, above him though was Nate Hobbs with a 9.62, then Isaiah Johnson with a 9.74. This averages out to a 8.94. So even more so it can be said that the Raiders front office likes their corners to score high on the athletic scale. Some people may say “well, yeah of course” but not all teams value that high level of athleticism in their defensive backs.

Continuing with the corners it seems the Raiders have two size types they like. Arnette and Hobbs are both just over 5’11 and both are about 195. Both also have pretty average speed. Arnette only ran the 40 so that is all the athletic testing available for him. Hobbs put up elite explosive numbers. With Mullen and Johnson both are just under 6’2 and between 200-205 pounds. Both have good to elite explosiveness. It seems that Mayock likes to have diffent size corners to match up with different receivers. Amik Robertson the 5th corner drafted stands out from the other corners. He is small at 5’8 187, but has no other testing on record.

Final Thoughts:

So outside of safety it seems Mayock really keys in on explosive testing, that would be things like vertical jump and broad jump. So if you are looking for players the Raiders may draft check their vertical jump and broad jump. They like their offensive linemen to be upper echelon athletes. Finally they like super athletic slightly undersized linebackers, especially big safeties they have move to linebacker. Finally outside of Amik Robertson they like their defensive backs 5’11+ and 195+.