NFL Draft: Thoughts On Packers Day 3 Picks

Finally, my thoughts on the Green Bay Packers day 3 picks from the NFL draft are here! The Packers had two picks in the 4th, one in the 5th (that they traded down), and four in the 7th. Below are my thoughts on every day 3 pick. If you haven’t already, check out my thoughts on the teams day one and day two picks. Now, let’s get to the show!

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Packers NFL Draft Day 3: Picks and Analysis

Romeo Doubs:

Romeo Doubs is a player who I had as a fit for the Packers way back on October. He has the size, physicality, and speed they like. He also showed flashes of the blocker that he could be at Nevada, occasionally burying defenders while blocking. Other times he would look either unsure of his assignment or unengaged. While he ran mostly deep routes at Nevada, when he was given a chance to run other routes he showed that he could and the potential was there for him to get better.

I had Doubs projected as a 3rd round pick, but he wasn’t able to work out at the combine or Nevada’s pro day due to an illness. He did have a private workout later where he reportedly ran in the 4.47-4.52 range. On film he looks closer to 4.47 — maybe even faster. He has speed and he knows how to get deep. An underrated part of his game is his ability to get YAC, or yards after the catch. He may not be a YAC monster, but he can get yards with physicality and his sneaky agility.

As far as a rookie, he projects to be the #4 or #5 receiver. He should also compete for the punt return job and maybe the kick return job, too. He also helps bring speed to the offense that has been lacking. Even Matt LaFleur mentioned this in his pre-draft press conference. Doubs also brings the big, strong body type the Packers like. If he improves his short and intermediate routes, he has #2 receiver potential. You could even consider him more pro-ready today than Watson.

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Zach Tom:

Zach Tom was one of the most Packers offensive linemen in the draft. He brings versatility to the field, having started two seasons at center and two seasons at left tackle — something you rarely see. He doesn’t have the greatest size at 6’4 304 with 33 1/4″ arms, but that has never been something to scare off the Packers.

The most important thing to them is movement skills; especially agility drills. Tom tested out elite in those categories. He does lack a bit of an anchor, and his body looks mostly filled out. That shows up on film where you can see him getting bull rushed at times. However, his feet and his ability to mirror are on another level. He held down Jermaine Johnson, who was destroying every one.

I would expect Tom to get a shot pretty much everywhere, maybe even left tackle. I do expect him to settle in at guard and center. Kind of like Lucas Patrick, but a better athlete on the field and he could back up at tackle as well. He reminds me a little of former Packer center Mike Flanagan.

Flanagan was 6’5″ 295-ish and was long, with a thin frame and not much of an anchor. He would get bull rushed on occasion, but was so quick and technical that he gave defensive linemen fits. He also was able to kick out to left tackle for a few games with Chad Clifton was injured. That is the kind of role Tom could have on the roster.

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Kingsley “JJ” Enagbare:

Kingsley or “JJ” Enagbare is a player who never produced big sacks numbers , but always produced pressures. He had 45 pressures in 2021 alone. Enagbare also had 24 in a shortened eight-game season in 2020.

He has good size at 6’4″ 258 pounds with long 34 3/4″ arms. While his 40 speed is on the slow side, his short area burst or explosion is very good on film. JJ, as he is known, also shows very heavy hands on film. He will knock back blockers with his strong hands. He still has some rawness to him. His pass rush moves and counters need improvement. Kingsley does set a good edge, though.

As as rookie, I would expect him to man the #3 edge rusher spot to give Rashan Gary and Preston Smith a break. He will probably also end up on some special teams. If he can hone his craft and work hard at it, he could develop into a starter down the road. He will probably never be a big sack guy, but should be a good all-around edge defender.

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Tariq Carpenter:

Tariq Carpenter is an interesting study. He played only safety at Georgia Tech, but has the size of a linebacker. He has the speed of a safety, but not the agility. Carpenter is kind of in middle. Even though his agility testing wasn’t great, because his speed and explosion testing were so good he still tested out as a elite athlete. Carpenter did give up 12 touchdown passes and allowed a completion percentage of 71 in his career at Georgia Tech. So it is probably best he moves to linebacker, which LaFleur has seemed to indicate.

This pick was a pure Rich Bisaccia pick. He will be a special teamer, and that’s about it. He is just a big, fast, strong athlete. The former Yellow Jacket may be able to develop into a decent #3 linebacker. If so, that’s just a bonus to what they expect out of him. Carpenter may even be able to develop into a nickel backer.

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Jonathan Ford:

Jonathan Ford is a pure nose tackle. 6’5″ 335 pounds plus with poor athletic testing. He is big and strong, and can clog up the middle. Career wise he was a disappointment at Miami. He started for three seasons but had little impact. He has three sacks in 2019 and none the rest of his career.

There were whispers of him being lazy and unmotivated. His poor testing points to that to an extent, because he doesn’t look sloppy. Maybe going so late in the draft will motivate him to work hard? We will see.

He doesn’t fit on this roster as a rookie. Even if he works his butt off, there is almost no room for him on the roster. The Packers already have three guys who can play nose tackle in Kenny Clark, Jarran Reed, and TJ Slaton. Plus, there’s Dean Lowry, Jack Heflin, and the recently drafted Devante Wyatt. The Packers use a lot of two DL packages, so there is not a need for four nose tackles. Especially not one who offers nothing as a pass rusher.

They usually keep either five or six defensive linemen. If they keep a sixth, it will be someone who can play some 4i or even 5-tech, not a 0-tech/nose tackle. He will be stashed on the practice squad with the hopes he can develop and make the roster in 2023.

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Rasheed Walker:

Early on in the process, Rasheed Walker was looking like a mid-round pick with some developmental potential. However, he didn’t play well in 2021, and also had an injury that hampered him and that didn’t allow him to work out at the combine or Penn State’s pro day.

Walker started three seasons at left tackle for Penn State. He gave up 26 pressures this past season, and seems to really struggle with speedy/bendy edge rushers. But in 2020 he only gave up 14. So, the knee injury probably did affect him some in 2021. He has great size at almost 6’6 313 pounds with 33 5/8″ arms.

The former Nittany Lion seems to have some similarities to Yosh Nijman. He was a multi-season starter at tackle for a major program. He has great size and good athleticism, with a lot of potential — but his technique is a mess. Walker is probably going to need a year or two on the practice squad to clean it up. But, due to Green Bays lack of depth at tackle, he probably makes the roster as a “redshirt”. He could back up right tackle and could be cross-trained for guard. I don’t see him being able to play left tackle long-term or as a starter in the NFL.

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Samori Toure:

Samori Toure was a transfer from Montana where he had 1,400 yards and 12 touchdowns in 2019. His 2020 season was lost due to COVID. He transferred to Nebraska for the 2021 season. Toure put up 896 yards and five touchdowns, which doesn’t sound like a lot but Nebraska is still a very run oriented offense, so the fact that he was able to put up those numbers in that offense — with not a very good quarterback — speaks to his skill level.

Toure also averaged 19.5 yards per catch. 80% of his snaps he lined up in the slot, but he can play outside. He has average size at 6’1″, 191 and looks like he could maybe add a few pounds to his frame. He has struggled some with getting off press coverage. That is something he will have to work on, along with getting stronger in the upper body. Athletically overall, he is average to slightly above average. The former Husker also has some special teams experience, which is a plus.

Toure probably doesn’t make the roster as long as everyone ahead of him can stay relatively healthy. He has kind of a redundant skill set right now, with there already being two slot receivers on the roster and Allen Lazard who sees snaps there as well. Until he can get stronger I don’t think they can trust him outside.

Toure has Sammy Watkins, Lazard, Randall Cobb, Amari Rodgers, Christian Watson, and Doubs ahead of him on the depth chart. LaFleur rarely keeps more than six receivers on the roster. He would need to show he could come in and play special teams and possibly be a returner. Even still, it’s more likely he spends a season on the practice squad. Eventually, though, he could develop into a solid #3/slot receiver.